Borres Residence

Borres House

Built in a narrow lot, only 8 meters wide, the design called for the use of firewalls on three sides. For natural lighting and ventilation, and for circulation, an atrium is located at the center of the property. This building is actually a multi-dwelling structure, with three individual units spaced out per floor. The main door opens to a foyer, from which all three units are accessed. Each unit has a corresponding secondary door.

 

 

This building is actually a multi-dwelling structure, with three individual units spaced out per floor. The main door opens to a foyer, from which all three units are accessed. Each unit has a corresponding secondary door.

 

Reyes Residence

Reyes

Built in a relatively long and narrow lot that slopes upwards, this residence in Cinco Hermanos consists of five different levels split between storeys. The lowest level contains a 2 car garage and storage space, and a walk up to the main door, half a storey above. The main entrance leads to an open plan for the living room and dining room (both opening to a garden on the side), and the kitchen further extending to a dirty kitchen among the service areas. A multi-purpose space / family room likewise opens up to the garden. Half a level above, level 3, is where the Master bedroom and its concomitant spaces serve as the first line of defence. At level 4, a bridgeway traverses the living room leading to a bedroom and bathroom. Finally, at level 5, is a guest room with bathroom. The house is generally C-shaped, with a central garden that provides light and ventilation to the entire house, and a visual oasis for an otherwise tightly built structure. The wall finishes are highlighted by exterior wood planks, which create a laid-back contemporary look.

Cuison Residence

cuison

This home in Eastville Filinvest is represented by modern block architecture, highlighted by sandstone finishes and large windows.
The plan is L-shaped at ground level, with the living room, dining room, kitchen, and multi-purpose room all opening up to the pool area, and U-shaped at the second floor where a wing protrudes over a lap pool below. The house is designed for an abundance of natural light and ventilation, and visual linkages from space to space.

Paz Residence

PazThe house is generally C-shaped, with a central garden that provides light and ventilation to the entire house, and a visual oasis for an otherwise tightly built structure. The wall finishes are highlighted by exterior wood planks, which create a laid-back contemporary look.

Filinvest Residence

Filinvest

This home in Eastville Filinvest is represented by modern block architecture, highlighted by sandstone finishes and large windows.
The plan is L-shaped at ground level, with the living room, dining room, kitchen, and multi-purpose room all opening up to the pool area, and U-shaped at the second floor where a wing protrudes over a lap pool below.
The house is designed for an abundance of natural light and ventilation, and visual linkages from space to space.

Ferrolino Residence

Ferolinomain

This residence, located at a corner lot in Vista Real, Quezon City, is a fusion of modern and traditional architecture. From one side the building reflects modern block architecture with a large picture window at the stairwell, and concrete fins, while from the other is the traditional gable roof and trellis. The plan, designed with several communal areas is very spacious with an open layout for the living room, dining room, and white kitchen extending to a large lanai. At the second floor is a large family area overlooking the living room below, and likewise extending to a large balcony overlooking the garden at the rear. The third floor is intended for storage, but also includes a large roof deck.

Mud House

Amidst the ever growing fondness for going “Green”, and among the countless innovations and projects that disguise themselves as sustainable, the mud house may stand out as the truest form of architectural sustainability. This mud house, built in Puerto Princesa, Palawan, is built primarily of local, indigenous materials, some of which is taken right from the land where it stands.

The mud house is circular in form, thus distributing the loads along the entire perimeter of the wall, and eliminating the need for corner posts. A central open space can double up as both a living and dining room. From the center, axes jut out towards the perimeter walls, creating trapezoidal-like spaces that form 2 bedrooms, a bathroom, and an open kitchen. Before entering the house, there is a patio that can likewise serve a multitude of uses.

The structure’s foundation is dug barely a foot into the ground, along the footprint of the exterior and interior walls, and is filled with gravel and a minimal amount of concrete. In areas where the topography dips, adobe stones are placed to retain the earth and even out the floor. From here, the frame is made entirely of bamboo. Poles about 50mm in diameter are used for vertical posts approximately every 3 meters, while in between is a vertical and horizontal grid of flat bamboo strips, spaced about 300mm both ways. Some connections are tied together with straw wrapped in wet mud. The roof’s framing system is formed by 50mm bamboo strips as rafters, and smaller flat strips for purlins.

This bamboo frame supports walls made of dried mud, about 200-250mm thick. For additional strength, and for a little more aesthetic value, the final layer is coated with lime. The floor is likewise made of hard, compacted mud, though a thin layer of concrete is also an option.  The roofing material is several layers of cogon grass. For additional light, bamboo frames create window openings and recycled bottles are installed within the walls. Inside the mud house, fixed benches, counters, and cabinets are also constructed with the same bamboo and mud combination.